Nature and technology meet at Gleason’s newest art show

by Karina Coombs   A series of ceramic scrolls from Bedford artist Carol Rissman. Rissman makes each tile from white or red clay before imprinting or stamping them with natural found objects. Pieces are then fired and stained. Tiles are selected individually for each scroll and mounted on a wooden backing. (Photo by Karina Coombs)     [Reprinted from the original Carlisle Mosquito article found here.] Gleason Library’s Art at the Gleason opened its first show of 2017 with “Affinity: puzzles, sculptures, and photography,” featuring the works of Carlisle residents Dale Joachim and Bill Claybrook and Bedford’s Carol Rissman. The show runs until March 25. The beauty of found objects Nature’s influence is apparent when looking at the ceramic works of local artist, Carol Rissman. Since retirement, as a broadcaster and news director for a local NPR station (in addition to writing and editing for a number of publications), Rissman has turned what had been a hobby into a full

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Video Snacking

Prefunerale Luigi Virgillito  from Ground’s Oranges on Vimeo. ~ A pre-funeral celebration, parodying 18th birthday vanity videos popular in Southern Italy.  And now that I’ve seen a few of those pre-diciottesimo videos this is so much better in every possible way.  It’s weird, has great imagery, and shows that Americans haven’t cornered the market on narcissism in a strangely reassuring way.  Oh you whacky Italians.

Fruit Bearing Trees

We are going on our second year in the antique rental house.  And I can feel the familiar calling of fall now that the hard little pears are starting to fall to the ground with a distinctive thud.  I wish I knew what kind of pears they are or what to do with them.  We have two trees of the same mysterious variety.  They get to be slightly smaller than a baseball and stay rock hard throughout the growing season. Last year I left a number of them on the counter for weeks at a time and they just got harder, not softer.  It doesn’t matter if I pick them off the tree or wait until they fall; they are impenetrable to both tooth and knife.  Most of them take on the physical characteristics of a potato with weird knobs and divots rather than the classic pear shape (though the photo does not show this) so I’m wondering if I

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